Environment

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More than eight months after the underwater volcano near Tonga erupted on Jan. 14, scientists are still analyzing the impacts of the violent blast, and they’re discovering that it could warm the planet. Recently, researchers calculated that the eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apa spewed a staggering 50 million tons (45 million metric tons) of water
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Lakes appearing in Alaska because of melting permafrost are “belching” methane into the atmosphere, a scientist working with NASA said. These lakes, called thermokarsts, are so full of the climate-damaging gas that it can be seen bubbling to the surface. More and more of these lakes are appearing as Alaska’s permafrost thaws with rising temperatures
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Burning the world’s remaining fossil fuel reserves would unleash 3.5 trillion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions – 7 times the remaining carbon budget to cap global heating at 1.5 degrees Celsius – according to the first public inventory of hydrocarbons released Monday. ​Human activity since the Industrial Revolution, largely powered by coal, oil, and gas,
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Failing to achieve the Paris agreement goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 °C could trigger multiple dangerous “tipping points” where changes to climate systems become self-sustaining, according to a major new study published in Science. Even current levels of warming have already put the world at risk of five major tipping points – including
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Scientists reviewing over a decade’s worth of studies on the fate of notorious pollutants – dubbed ‘forever chemicals’ for the way they persist in waterways, soils, and sea ice – have unearthed where environmental hotspots of contamination lie. The review, led by hydrologist Xueyan Lyu of Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, focused specifically
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Massive swathes of wilderness and the lives of billions of animals were extinguished into ash and smoke during Australia’s Black Summer bushfires. The resulting haze suffocated major cities, triggered fatal health emergencies, and turned distant glaciers brown. Now researchers have directly traced how some of this burnt biomass contributed to the largest stratospheric warming in
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A team of scientists has discovered a simple, low-energy way to break apart one of the largest groups of ‘forever chemicals’, nefarious pollutants that have been linked to environmental harm and human health concerns. While practical applications are still a way off, scientists are in awe of the new technique’s potential. In detailed simulations, PFAS