Nature

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Teeny tiny jumping spiders, with their wondrous eyes, seem to be able to do something we’d only ever seen before in vertebrates: distinguishing between animate and inanimate objects. In a 2021 test, wild jumping spiders (Menemerus semilimbatus) behaved differently when presented with simulated objects of both kinds, in ways that indicated an ability to discern
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When lightning flashes above, plants on the ground may respond in kind. Scientists have long been aware that plants and trees can emit small, visible electric discharges from the tips of their leaves when the plants are trapped beneath the electrical fields generated by thunderstorms high overhead. These discharges, known as coronas, are sometimes visible
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Strange libraries of supplementary genes nicknamed “Borg” DNA appear to supercharge the microbes that possess them, giving them an uncanny ability to metabolize materials in their environment faster than their competitors. By learning more about the way organisms use these unusual extrachromosomal packets of information, researchers are hoping to find new ways of engineering life
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Near-black frogs far outnumber their highlighter-yellow fellows in Chernobyl‘s radiation-blasted ecosystems, in a direct example of “evolution in action,” a new study shows. The study, published August 29 in the journal Evolutionary Applications, found that eastern tree frogs (Hyla orientalis) with more skin-darkening melanin pigment were more likely to survive the 1986 nuclear accident in
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Without urgent and major interventions, America’s Great Salt Lake could experience ecosystem collapse in the next few years. In a worst-case scenario, according findings presented at the Geological Society of America’s 2022 Connects Conference in Colorado this past weekend, the world-famous body of salt-water has just a few months before ecological recovery is significantly impeded